A REAL 3 Dimensional Desktop

February 21, 2008

I’m a big proponent in open source software for a few reasons, the best of which is the ability of anyone to work on anything and have anyone else help them if they wish. This really opens up the world to groundbreaking new ideas.

One of the biggest things, in my opinion, in ground breaking new ideas is Compiz-Fusion, the open source OpenGL accelerated desktop environment for Linux. I’ve talked about it in the past, but not really extensively. What Compiz Fusion does is turn over the rendering of your desktop from your CPU to your GPU allowing for some really awesome effects (AKA Eyecandy) without adding any additional overhead to the actual computing power of your computer. For instance, I can do just about anything, and a whole lot more, than Windows Vista’s Aero interface or Mac’s OS-X interface can on a machine that is generally considered sub-par by todays computer standards – a 2 GHZ Athlon, 500 Megs of RAM and an Nvidia GeForce 6200 with 256 megs of memory on a 4x AGP port. This is top of the line 2003 hardware here, but in case you hadn’t noticed, this is 2008, 5 years later than my technology.

Now some developers have taken Compiz-Fusion to an all new level. The current 3d desktop is really just a rendered 2d desktop with some effects to make it look pretty. SmSpillaz and others have really made the Compiz-Fusion interface into 3 Dimensions! Take a look at the following video if you don’t believe me:

Advertisements

A different idea for the 3D desktop

August 8, 2007

I came across this video today about a different (completely different) 3 dimensional desktop from OS X, MS Aero or Compiz. It’s called BumpTop and it’s interesting in that it is more like working with your Real Life desktop with documents scattered and strewn about your computer desktop, the ability to stack or pile them, sort them and rifle through them.

Check out the video, this is really compelling stuff!


Compiz-Fusion release 0.5.2 announced

August 4, 2007

Check it out here

For those who don’t know, Compiz-Fusion is a true 3D accelerated version of your desktop. Why not let your processor process processes and let your graphic card actually show you what you sunk $300 into it for?

Want to see Compiz-Fusion in action? Take a look at this video first, then head over to Youtube for more.

Sorry Windows users, Compiz is only for Linux. Billy et al already tried to give you a pretty interface with Aero. What? You can’t use Aero because your computer isn’t fast enough? Maybe you should switch to Linux, it’s making a damned fine entry into the desktop market with distributions like Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

I’ve been running Compiz-Fusion just dandy-fine for the last month on my 2004 Compaq Presario with a whopping 2 GHZ Athlon, 512 megs of RAM and a Geforce 6200 AGP-4x.


Razer Boomslang to retail for $99.99 (USD)

July 2, 2007

As previously mentioned, the Boomslang is coming back. They don’t yet list a price but Google shows something different – $99.00…

razergoogleprice1.jpg

The specs are now up on Razer’s product page:

  • 1800dpi Razer Precision™ 3G infrared sensor
  • 1000Hz Ultrapolling™ / 1ms response
  • Five independently programmable Hyperesponse™ buttons
  • On-The-Fly Sensitivity™ adjustment
  • Always-On™ mode
  • 16-bit ultra-wide data path
  • Zero-acoustic Ultraslick™ Teflon feet
  • 32KB Razer Synapse™ onboard memory

And as I guessed, it’s closely based on the Razer DeathAdder internals:

  • 1800dpi Razer Precision™ 3G infrared sensor
  • 1000Hz Ultrapolling™ / 1ms response
  • Five independently programmable Hyperesponse™ buttons
  • On-The-Fly Sensitivity™ adjustment
  • Always-On™ mode
  • 16-bit ultra-wide data path
  • Zero-acoustic Ultraslick™ Teflon feet
  • 6400 frames per second (5.8 megapixels per second)
  • Up to 60 inches per second and 15g of acceleration

The DeathAdder does not list 32KB of memory, but it’s there and supports profile switching. I notice that the Boomslang does not boast 5.8 megapixel and 15G of acceleration, though with the memory listing difference I wouldn’t be surprised if this similar rather than a different feature set.

Curious about 3G Infrared Sensor technology? Check out Razer’s 3G PR page


Windows Vista transmitting personal information in 30+ places

July 1, 2007

Windows Vista is collecting your personal information and transmitting it back to Microsoft in over 30 different places, features, applications and/or tool sets…

Windows Update, Webcontent, Digital Certificates, Auto Root Update, Windows Media Digital Rights Management, Windows Media Player, Malicious Software Removal/Clean On Upgrade, Network Connectivity Status Icon, Windows Time Service, and the IPv6 Network Address Translation (NAT) Traversal service (Teredo) are the features and services that collect and deliver data to Microsoft from Windows Vista.

Furthermore the following also collect personal data but do not necessarily transmit it all back to Microsoft:

Activation, Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP), Device Manager, Driver Protection, Dynamic Update, Event Viewer, File Association Web Service, Games Folder, Error Reporting for Handwriting Recognition, Input Method Editor (IME), Installation Improvement Program, Internet Printing, Internet Protocol version 6 Network Address Translation Traversal, Network Awareness (somewhat), Parental Controls, Peer Name Resolution Service, Plug and Play, Plug and Play Extensions, Program Compatibility Assistant, Program Properties—Compatibility Tab, Program Compatibility Wizard, Properties, Registration, Rights Management Services (RMS) Client, Update Root Certificates, Windows Control Panel, Windows Help, Windows Mail (only with Windows Live Mail, Hotmail, or MSN Mail) and Windows Problem Reporting are the main features and services in Windows Vista that collect and transmit user data to Microsoft.

Read the full article from Softpedia here